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Yukon man happy video of RCMP officer hitting him has gone viral

first_imgAPTN National NewsJosh Skookum alleges he was brutalized by an RCMP officer seen in a video taken by an onlooker at a house party early Easter Sunday.The video was uploaded to Facebook minutes after the incident and has been viewed close to a million times.“I think it’s a good thing,” said Skookum, of Little Salmon Carmacks First Nation in the Yukon. “People deserve justice for not doing anything.”Skookum has a broken nose and two black eyes, but was charged with resisting arrest and assaulting a police officer.APTN’s Shirley McLean has the story.last_img read more

Amazon HQ locations Similar basics but different vibes

first_imgNEW YORK — The two communities that learned Tuesday they are about to become homes to a pair of big, new East Coast bases for Amazon are both riverfront stretches of major metropolitan areas with ample transportation and space for workers.But there are plenty of differences between New York’s Long Island City and Crystal City in northern Virginia.Set within eyeshot of the nation’s capital, Crystal City is a thicket of 1980s-era office towers trying to plug into new economic energy after thousands of federal jobs moved elsewhere.Rapidly growing Long Island City is an old manufacturing area already being reinvented as a hub for 21st-century industry, creativity and urbane living.Seattle-based Amazon, which set out last year to situate one additional headquarters, announced Tuesday that it was splitting its project into two.A look at the two communities:LONG ISLAND CITYIt’s already the fastest-developing neighbourhood in the nation’s most populous city, and Amazon could pump up the volume in this buzzy part of Queens.The addition of Amazon to the neighbourhood stands to burnish New York City’s reputation as a tech capital. Landing Amazon also cements Long Island City’s transformation from a faded manufacturing zone to a vibrant, of-the-moment enclave of waterfront skyscrapers, modernized warehouses and artsy-tech ambience across the East River from midtown Manhattan.“I joke that we’re experiencing explosive growth 30 years in the making,” said Elizabeth Lusskin, president of the Long Island City Partnership, a neighbourhood development group.But Long Island City also has been straining to handle its growth.Days before Tuesday’s announcement , the city unveiled a $180 million plan to address Long Island City’s packed schools, street design and a sewage system that groans in heavy rain. But those projects will just catch up with current needs, said area City Councilman Jimmy van Bramer.“I know that there are a lot of people cheerleading for this, but HQ2 has to work for Queens and the people of Queens. It can’t just be good for Amazon,” said van Bramer, a Democrat. After the announcement, he said Amazon had “duped New York into offering unprecedented amounts of tax dollars to one of the wealthiest companies on Earth.”Once a bustling factory and freight-moving area, Long Island City saw many of its plants and warehouses closed as manufacturing shriveled in New York City.The neighbourhood’s rebirth began in the 1980s, when officials broached redeveloping a swath of the waterfront, while artists were drawn by warehouse spaces, affordable rents and a building that is now the MoMA PS1 museum. Silvercup Studios — where such TV shows as “Sex and the City,” ”30 Rock” and “The Sopranos” have been filmed — opened in 1983.Long Island City gained a new commercial stature, and the start of a high-rise skyline, when the banking giant now called Citi opened an office tower there in 1989. But the area’s growth lately has been driven by residential building.Some 9,150 new apartments and homes have been built since 2010, more than in any other New York City neighbourhood, according to the city Planning Department . Thousands more units are in the works.The location identified by the state as the spot for Amazon’s new campus is currently a collection of low-rise industrial buildings and parking lots wrapped around a boat basin.New York has striven for nearly a decade to position itself as a tech hotspot.Venture capitalists poured $5.8 billion into New York-area startups last quarter, more than any other region except the San Francisco area, according to the consulting and accounting firm PwC . Established tech giants, including Google and Facebook, have been expanding their New York footprints.Still, landing HQ2 represents “incredible validation of just how far New York has come,” said Jonathan Bowles, executive director of the Center for an Urban Future think-tank .Waiting for a subway, Long Island City community board chairwoman Denise Keehan-Smith could envision Amazon benefiting the neighbourhood.“But I think we have to be careful about it,” she said.CRYSTAL CITYIf any place in America can absorb 25,000 Amazon jobs without disruption, it may well be Crystal City, Virginia, where nearly that many jobs have vanished over the last 15 years.The neighbourhood in Arlington County is bounded by the Potomac River and the nation’s capital on one side, by the Pentagon on another and Reagan National Airport on a third.Despite its prime location and abundant transportation options, the neighbourhood has been hit by a massive outflow of jobs. The Patent and Trademark Office began moving more than 7,000 jobs out of Crystal City in 2003. In 2005, the Defence Department announced plans to move roughly 17,000 jobs elsewhere as part of a base realignment.Arlington County has worked hard to bring in new employers, and had some success. The Public Broadcasting Service moved its headquarters to Crystal City in 2006.Still, large swaths of the neighbourhood remain vacant. Among other challenges, the area has fought to overcome a reputation for outdated architecture.Crystal City is populated by ’70s and ’80s-era office buildings. The buildings are connected by a network of tunnels populated with food-court style dining options, hair salons and newsstands. The tunnels leave the ground-level outdoor streetscape sometimes looking empty.Brookings Institution urban planner Jenny Schuetz suggested the buildings may require an upgrade, or even replacement. But she noted that while people often associate tech companies with converted lofts or state-of-the art workspaces, many big Silicon Valley tech companies actually work out of ’80s-era office buildings.For all the talk about antiquated architecture, people who’ve actually worked in Crystal City appreciate its convenience and its worker-friendly features, including the tunnels.“I loved it here,” said Christine Gentry of Greenbelt, Maryland, as she ate breakfast in a largely empty food court. She works for the Patent and Trademark Office and preferred the days when her office was in Crystal City.“Everything is accessible here,” she said. “When it was raining or snowing or sleeting, I never had to go out.”Perhaps no place better illustrates the vibe of Crystal City than the region’s only revolving restaurant, the Skydome atop the Doubletree Crystal City. Diners enjoy a panoramic view of the D.C. skyline, completing a full rotation every 47 minutes.Sam Getachew, the hotel’s food and beverage manager, said the restaurant fits the neighbourhood’s retro atmosphere.“It’s huge draw,” Getachew said. “People come for the curiosity of it.”The only downside, he said, is that “when customers get up to go to the restroom, they don’t know where they are when they come back.”When Amazon announced its plans Tuesday, it said its footprint will extend beyond Crystal City into the adjacent neighbourhoods of Pentagon City and Potomac Yard, which have collectively been dubbed “National Landing” by the region’s economic development officials.___Barakat reported from Arlington, Virginia.Jennifer Peltz And Matthew Barakat, The Associated Presslast_img read more

NEATs Learn to Can Series

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Northern Environmental Action Team has brought back their canning and preserving sessions they share are designed for beginner and novice canners.With three different hands-on workshops, there is something to learn about canning, fermenting and pressure canning. Learn to CanCovers the basics of water bath canning and provides a broad overview of safe methods perfect for beginner or novice canners. $40 Tuesday, August 27th, 2019 – 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm at the Calvary Baptist ChurchLearn to FermentCovers the basics of the fermenting process including science and safety. This class is perfect for those that have never fermented or have been experimenting and would like to learn more. $35Thursday, September 12th, 2019 and Tuesday, September 17th, 2019, 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm at the Calvary Baptist ChurchLearn to Pressure CanThis class builds on the Learn to Can and specifically focuses on pressure canning. You will learn how to safely and confidently can low acid items like soup stock and meat. While Learn to Can is not a prerequisite, it is recommended that participants have a basic knowledge/experience of canning. Thursday, September 26th, 2019, 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm at the Calvary Baptist Church To view the FB event page to select the session you would like to attend and purchase tickets; CLICK HERElast_img read more

UN agency zeroes in on green industry to lift poorest States out

7 December 2009The United Nations agency entrusted with accelerating sustainable industrial development in poorer States opened its general conference today, focusing on the opportunities offered by “green industries” in both combating climate change and attaining economic growth. “Rather than limiting growth, a green industrial revolution could and should form the core of our response to climate change, and may be our best hope of sustainable recovery from the economic crisis,” UN Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) Director-General Kandeh Yumkella told the opening session of the week-long conference in Vienna.“All developed nations have harnessed industry as the main driver of their prosperity, and it is still the best hope for ending poverty’s reign over the so-called ‘Bottom Billion’ of humankind,” he said, stressing that the potential is there for new clean methods of production, industries focusing on mitigation and adaptation services, and greater use of renewable energy.A recent global development trend is emerging in favour of investments in green industry, with reports suggesting that about 15 per cent of global stimulus packages in 2009 are green with investments in technologies, infrastructure and strategies to combat climate change, he added.The cost of producing renewable energy is dropping fast, with a rapid increase in production of solar panels and wind turbines leading to a 50 per cent and 20 per cent drop in unit prices respectively in 2009 alone, he said. Mr. Yumkella, a Sierra Leonean who today was elected to a second term as Director-General, also stressed the need for economic diversification, especially for those countries with an abundance of tradable natural resources.“Diversification provides security against volatility, and extends the benefits of growth to the many instead of the few,” he said, citing Malaysia as an example of a country that used the boon of natural resources – oil and gas revenues – first to fuel an agribusiness-led industrialization model, and later to build a fully diversified economy.In a message to the meeting, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon welcomed the focus on industry’s role in sustainable green growth, noting that the conference coincided with the UN summit in Copenhagen on climate change. “Our shared goal is a fair and effective agreement that will reduce emissions while helping vulnerable communities adapt,” he said.“Industry is central to this effort. Industry and industrial policy can fuel new ways of thinking and acting, including a commitment to cleaner sources of energy and energy efficiency; a decisive move toward a low-carbon economy; and a new path to prosperity for the billions of people who have limited access to energy, water and other basics.”In recent years, UNIDO has assumed an enhanced role in global development by focusing on poverty reduction, inclusive globalization and environmental sustainability, based on two core functions – as a global forum to disseminate industry-related knowledge, and as a technical cooperation agency to provide technical support and implement projects. read more

Lanka denies intimidating UN over Tamil deaths

Plantations Minister Mahinda Samarasinghe told a press conference in the capital, Colombo, that he did not want to comment directly on the report.But he said: “How can you intimidate them [the UN]? They don’t get intimidated by anyone.” As the LTTE retreated from the government advance, they forced the civilians to come with them. According to the PoE most, though by no means all, of the civilian deaths were caused by government shelling. The Tigers shot people trying to escape and continued forcible conscription. The government rejected the report.The only international organisation left in the shrinking rebel zone was the International Committee of the Red Cross. Four days before the war ended the ICRC spoke of an “unimaginable humanitarian catastrophe”.Most of the media were completely excluded from the north. Five doctors in the rebel area who reported the casualty situation to the media were imprisoned by the government and in July 2009 paraded before the media and mysteriously recanted, saying fewer than 700 civilians died from January to May – a figure much lower than that the government this year admitted to. Palitha Kohona said his country had worked with senior UN officials. The Sri Lankan government has denied allegations that it intimidated UN staff at the end of the civil war.The claims were made in a UN report leaked to the BBC, in which the UN accused itself of failing the civilian Tamil population in the final stages of the conflict in 2009. The Sri Lankan UN ambassador said it was “absolute nonsense” to say a “small country” could intimidate the UN. The final months of the war saw hundreds of thousands of Tamil civilians – 330,000, according to the UN Panel of Experts (PoE) report of 2011 – trapped in the territory held by the Tamil Tigers (LTTE). The UN’s investigation into its own conduct during the last months of the conflict concluded: “Events in Sri Lanka mark a grave failure of the UN.”It said the organisation should in future “be able to meet a much higher standard in fulfilling its protection and humanitarian responsibilities”.The report does highlight the positive role played by some UN staff on the ground and the secretary general, but it points to a “systemic failure”. It questions decisions such as the withdrawal of UN staff from the war zone in September 2008 after the Sri Lankan government warned it could no longer guarantee their safety.A Tamil school teacher now seeking asylum in Britain, said “We begged them [the UN], we pleaded with them not to leave the area. They did not listen to us.”The teacher who did not want to be named, added: “If they had stayed there, and listened to us, many more people would be alive today.”The UN’s former humanitarian chief, John Holmes, has criticised the report.Mr Holmes said the UN faced “some very difficult dilemmas” at the time and could be criticised for the decisions it had taken.“But the idea that if we behaved differently, the Sri Lankan government would have behaved differently I think is not one that is easy to reconcile with the reality at the time,” he told the BBC’s Newshour programme.In September 2009, Sri Lanka expelled the country spokesman for Unicef, James Elder, who had updated the media on the plight of children caught up in the conflict.Palitha Kohona, who was then permanent secretary at the Sri Lankan ministry of foreign affairs, accused him of spreading propaganda for the Tamil Tigers after he reported seeing babies with shrapnel and gunshot injuries.The government and Tamil rebels are accused of war crimes in the brutal conflict which ended in May 2009.The 26-year war left at least 100,000 people dead. There are still no confirmed figures for tens of thousands of civilian deaths in the last months of battle.An earlier UN investigation said it was possible up to 40,000 people had been killed in the final five months alone. Others suggest the number of deaths could be even higher.Hundreds of thousands of Tamil civilians remained in the war zone, exploited by both sides: forcibly recruited by Tamil Tigers or used as human shields; or under indiscriminate government fire.On the day before the war ended, 17 May 2009, Mr Samarasinghe said: “Soldiers saved all the Tamil civilians trapped inside the war zone without shedding a drop of blood.” (BBC) read more

Condemning latest violence UN chief urges leaders to pull Iraq back from

“He condemns in the strongest terms the acts of terrorism and the heightened sectarian violence, which are aimed at ripping apart the country’s social fabric,” Mr. Ban’s spokesperson said in a statement.The reported killing today of at least 50 people in a wave of car bombings in predominantly Shiite areas is just the latest occurrence of the kind of heinous violence which is becoming all too commonplace, the statement added. Mr. Ban extended his deepest condolences to the families of the victims and the Government of Iraq and wished the wounded a speedy recovery. He also urged the Iraqi authorities to bring the perpetrators of these attacks to justice.“Iraq is at another crossroads,” said the statement. “Its political leaders have a clear responsibility to bring the country back from the brink, and to leave no space to those who seek to exploit the political stalemate through violence and terror. “The Secretary-General urges Iraqi political leaders to address the legitimate grievances of all Iraqi communities by entering into a serious dialogue with a spirit of compromise, and by passing overdue legislation without further delay. The United Nations stands ready to assist the Government and people of Iraq in overcoming the crisis.”The UN envoy in Iraq has also called on political leaders to take immediate and decisive action to end the “senseless bloodshed” that has gripped the country. “I am deeply concerned about the heightened level of violence, which carries the danger that the country falls back into sectarian strife,” the Acting Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Iraq, Gyorgy Busztin, said in a news release.“Iraq is bleeding from random violence, which sadly reached record heights during the holy month of Ramadan,” noted Mr. Busztin, who serves with the UN Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI). read more

Buckeyes add pair of walkons to basketball squad

The Ohio State basketball team didn’t sign any new recruits for this season, but they did add two new players. In mid-October, the OSU basketball team held tryouts for new walk-ons to make the team. After all was said and done, two new walk-ons had impressed the coaching staff enough to earn a spot on the roster.Eddie Days, a 6-foot guard, and Dustin Reynolds, a 6-foot-6-inch forward, were the two players that made the team.“It was amazing. I‘ve always dreamed of playing here, playing at a big school like this and just being part of a great program,” Reynolds said. “I am living a dream every day, working hard and just trying to make the guys better.”Days also shared his excitement about making the team, the second time he has made the OSU roster.“I was real excited,” he said. “It’s something I’ve been working on since the beginning of the summertime.”   Days made the team two seasons ago, but could not stay on the team due to injuries. He is now healthy and ready to contribute. “I just want to fit in and become part of the team,” Days said. “I know my job; my job is to help out in practice and get those guys ready for the games.” The Cleveland native was a three-time letterwinner in basketball during high school at Richmond Heights. At OSU he will be a senior academically, but he will have two years left of eligibility to play basketball for the Buckeyes.  It was the first time going through the process for Reynolds. He played one season at Hillsdale College, but sat out last season with an injured back. Now injury-free, Reynolds will return to the basketball court wearing a Buckeye uniform. Reynolds led his high school team in scoring and rebounding. It was always his dream to play basketball for the Buckeyes, he said.In this first season with OSU, Reynolds will be red-shirted, since he transferred in to OSU from a different school. Under NCAA rules, a player who transfers between Division I schools must sit out a year. When he sees actual game action next season, he will have two years of eligibility remaining. This season, he will be a big part of helping the players get better at practice and preparing them for games. This same group of Buckeyes has been playing together for a year, so the players understand what it takes to win. Both walk-ons want to come in and fit into the system. They know their roles on this team and they just want to contribute to this already good basketball team. “I expect great things,” Reynolds said. “We’re having great practices and who knows, we’re just going to ride things out and see where it takes us.” read more

Sherborne Sensors launches gravityreferenced dual axis inclinometers

first_imgSherborne Sensors, a global leader in the design and manufacture of sensors has released the T820 series, a new range of high precision, gravity referenced dual axis inclinometers for measurements in space constrained environments such as borehole or well logging and seismic studies. Available for ranges from ±14.5° to ±60°, they are Sherborne’s smallest diameter inclinometers at just 23 mm in diameter and 161 mm in length.  The T820 Series includes the T823 with an environmentally sealed connector and cable system or theT825 with solder pin terminations. They can operate from a bi-polar input voltage range of ±12 to ±18 Vdc or single ended voltage range of 9 to 18 Vdc.  A high level output of ±5 Vdc is achieved for the bi-polar supplied unit and 0.5 to 4.5 Vdc for the single ended version.The T820 Series sensors are made from stainless steel to prevent corrosion and to reduce angular errors that can be caused by the mechanical flexibility found in alternative aluminium alloy constructed sensors. They also have an innovative precision angular alignment capability for increased installed resolution. The inclinometers continue to deliver precision accuracy in temperatures ranging from -18 to 70o C and will survive temperatures down to minus 40o C.“Borehole logging for the drilling minerals or as part of environmental or geotechnical studies requires high levels of precision and accuracy,” explains Mike Baker, Managing Director of Sherborne Sensors. “The T820 series has been designed to operate in the smallest of areas and can withstand high levels of mechanical shock without any degradation in performance.”Sherborne Sensors can customise all of its inclinometers designs and manufacture to conform to specific customer requirements.last_img read more

Fluor in EPCM agreement with Anglo for Quellaveco

first_imgFluor Corporation has received a limited notice to proceed from Anglo American for engineering, procurement and construction management (EPCM) services for the Quellaveco copper project in Peru. This is an additional opportunity in the stage-gate process for Anglo American to validate the economic case of the project. Fluor booked the mining contract for an undisclosed value in the first quarter of 2014.The Quellaveco project, one of the biggest copper projects in Peru, includes a copper production facility and port expansion. Fluor will provide project planning and early engineering services from its offices in Lima, Peru, and Santiago, Chile. “The Quellaveco project is an important project for Anglo American and for the country of Peru,” said Rick Koumouris, president of Fluor’s Mining & Metals business line. “We are very pleased to be selected by Anglo American to be their partner in progressing the development of the project and to continue Fluor’s 20-plus year legacy in Peru.” Additionally, Fluor will provide construction management and early works execution services for the project in southern Peru. The work is expected to be completed over the next 18 months.last_img read more

La Lune pourrait contenir 100 fois plus deau que prévu

first_imgLa Lune pourrait contenir 100 fois plus d’eau que prévuEspace – Une nouvelle étude menée à la Carnegie Institution de Washington sème le trouble chez les scientifiques. Selon elle, le satellite naturel de la Terre pourrait contenir une quantité d’eau 100 fois plus importante que ce qu’avaient estimé les précédentes recherches menées sur le sujet. Les récentes missions lunaires avaient déjà mis en évidence la présence d’eau gelée dans certains cratères à la surface du satellite, et de glace sous la couche de poussière grise recouvrant l’astre. À lire aussiSpaceX : un satellite d’Elon Musk manque d’entrer en collision avec un satellite de l’ESAUne nouvelle étude montre quant à elle qu’il pourrait y avoir assez d’eau à l’intérieur de la Lune pour recouvrir sa surface d’une mer d’environ un mètre de profondeur. “Pendant 40 ans, nous avons pensé que la Lune était aride” explique Francis McCubbin qui a conduit l’étude à la Carnegie Institution de Washington. “Nous avons trouvé qu’en réalité, la quantité minimum d’eau était comprise entre 64 parties par milliard et 5 parties par million – soit au moins deux ordres de grandeur de plus que les précédentes estimations”. Les scientifiques pensent aujourd’hui que la Lune a pu se former après qu’un objet de la taille de Mars est entré en collision avec la Terre, éjectant des matériaux qui ont fusionné sur la Lune. Si la majeure partie de l’eau formée alors s’est évaporée, il en est resté une quantité non négligeable.  Pas d’emballement cependant : selon ce rapport, cette eau n’est pas directement accessible, car prisonnière des roches lunaires. Ce n’est donc pas encore demain que l’Homme ira s’approvisionner en eau sur la Lune. Le 18 juin 2010 à 09:59 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

TCIG Receives Donation of Printer from Private Sector Partner

first_img Stray livestock causing trouble, owners warned Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 28 Oct 2014 (TCIG NEWS RELEASE) – The Ministry of Environment and Home Affairs, Department of Agriculture, is the recent recipient of a HP printer from its private sector partner Cairsea Services Limited. This donation enables the Department to boost the efficiency with which it prepares and issues permits to the many importers and shippers throughout the Islands. It provides the Department with more redundancy in its printing capacity. Delivery of import permit services is time sensitive and agricultural goods cannot be cleared from the ports without these documents. This donation also comes at a time when the numbers of applications for import permits will increase due to the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. Dr. Mark Butler, Chief Veterinary Officer stated; “This is a perfect example of local businesses assisting governmental departments to facilitate the much needed services upon which the public depends. “The Department would like to personally thank Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Thompson and Mr. Seymour of Cairsea Services Limited for their generosity in donating this much needed gift.”ENDS Government Press OfficeWaterloo Road, Grand TurkTurks & Caicos IslandsTel: (649) 338-3924/ 338-3925Ext: 3924/3925Email: tcigpressrelease@gov.tcWeb: gov.tc/pressofficeWe are on Facebook: www.facebook.com/pressofficetcig Related Items:chief veterinary, department of agriculture, mark butler, Ministry of Environment and Home Affairs Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp New Director for Agriculture vows to create Policy Recommended for you Pet passports now approved for travel between The Turks and Caicos and Canadalast_img read more

State educators adapt to new Every Student Succeeds Act

first_imgThe state education department is seeking public input on a new plan to meet Alaska’s unique education challenges. Under the new federal law, Every Student Succeeds Act, the state must design its own requirements to meet the standards under the new federal law.Every Student Succeeds replaces the old No Child Left Behind federal program. Margaret MacKinnon is a director of accountability with the Alaska department of education. She said the public is invited to attend any one of a series of webinars now being offered to present the key elements of a state plan for measuring schools and districts.“Well the state has more flexibility under this new law to create some options for sections of the state plan, so we have created a series of five webinars that are available not only to invited members of educational organizations, but also to the general public,” MacKinnon said. “They will have an opportunity to have an overview of what the elements of the plan will be, and then to give us some of their ideas on what they value most.”Mackinnon said local control of educational systems is a priority with the state Board of Education.“Well the new law made some significant changes in giving more control back to states, local education agencies and schools in designing the best system for the state,” Mackinnon said.MacKinnon said all people are invited to join in the webinars.The webinars started Wednesday and are repeated four times through June 13. The webinars can be accessed through the state department of education home page on the state of Alaska website at www.education.alaska.gov under News and Announcements.last_img read more

49 Voices Darlena Fritzler of Wasilla

first_imgThis week we’re hearing from Darlena Fritzler, of Wasilla. Fritzler is the Development Manager for the Alaska branch of the YWCA.Listen Now Darlena Fritzler lives in Wasilla. (Photo by Wesley Early, Alaska Public Media – Anchorage)FRITZLER: Our mission is to eliminate racism and empower women. We’re actually not related to the YMCA at all, which is a very common misconception. The YWCA used to stand for Young Women’s Christian Association a very long time ago. Now it’s just initials. We like to say Young Women Can Achieve.Anchorage specifically has the most diverse population in the United States. (Editor’s note: While Anchorage has the nation’s most diverse neighborhood: Mountain View, as a municipality, Alaska’s largest city is about average in diversity when compared to the rest of the United States.) We speak at least, last time I looked, 90 different languages in our schools. So I think with that, we have a ton of issues when it comes to eliminating racism for instance.I’m obviously privileged. I’m a white woman, a professional woman. And I don’t see a whole lot of the prejudice that a lot of other people do. My husband is not; he’s Hispanic and, growing up here, he grew up in a completely white family, and he doesn’t notice when it happens to him.For instance, we went to Washington a few months ago. And I’m TSA pre-check…. never have a problem. Go through the airport, no problem. He gets pulled every time for the “special search”. And he’s military, he’s the superintendent for a Native corporation, and that happens to him everywhere we go. So seeing that has definitely given me a different perspective.I think that that’s the beauty of being Alaskan, that we’re not all the same. In Alaska you can almost be anything you want. If you can do anything, it’s just to remember that we’re all people, and to always be kind. I mean, that’s like the Golden rule. Just respect each other.last_img read more

Listen Explosive audio clip about factionalism in Pakistan cricket team goes viral

first_imgIt seems that different players are pulling in different directions for PakistanIAN KINGTON/AFP/GettyIn the Indian subcontinent, a poor performance by a cricket team is followed by all sorts of theories and rumours regarding what’s happening behind the scenes. In Pakistan, this is taken to another level. After the disappointing show of Sarfaraz Ahmed-led side in the World Cup game against India, all sorts of blame games are playing out in the media.From digging old graves to propagating conspiracy theories, experts and commentators are letting it rip at the entire cricket governance structure of the country. To add more masala to the drama, there is an audio clip of actor and former Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) official Raju Jamil that has gone viral on social media.In this audio file, Jamil is making shocking claims about there being a faction of players in Pakistan’s squad who are trying to unseat Sarfaraz Ahmed due to him being from Karachi. He claims that he confronted Shoaib Malik while shooting for an ad and told him off for attempting to undermine Sarfaraz’s authority.The former media manager of Pakistan team names Imad Wasim as the person who is sought to be placed at the head of the team by this cabal. He also indicts chief selector Inzamam-ul-Haq for being part of this plot and his nephew Imam-ul-Haq as a member of this group.The audio recording of Jamil making big claims about Pakistan teamYouTube/Bite PostThis rant came to light on June 14 but picked up currency after Pakistan’s heavy loss to India in a World Cup game. Pakistani fans and commentators were searching for people to blame for their shambolic performance and everyone seemed fair game. While many targeted captain Sarfaraz Ahmed for his decision to bowl first, some went deeper into the reasons why Pakistani cricket is suffering. Jamil’s voice would have got drowned out amidst the cacophony of noises had his diatribe not been leaked.In response to this ‘expose,’ PCB has issued a statement rejecting the claims in the audio clip and completely refuted claims of factionalism. They have even talked about taking legal action against Raju Jamil.On his part, Jamil appeared on a Pakistani news channel to answer questions and, on live TV, seemed much more cautious and mellow while talking about Shoaib and the alleged factionalism. He even agreed when the anchor asked if the leak of audio clip could be a conspiracy to malign him and obstruct his coming projects with Pakistani cricketers.But the fact remains that Pakistan cricket has always been afflicted by murky dealings. This is why every rumour and allegation is likely to be believed by the fans.last_img read more

Elon Musk cancels plans to take Tesla private plan cancelled after board

first_imgFile Photo Elon MuskElectric carmaker Tesla will remain a publicly traded company, CEO Elon Musk said, barely weeks after he floated the idea of going private.”Our investors are extremely important to me. Almost all have stuck with us from the time we went public in 2010, when we had no cars in production and only a vision of what we wanted to be.”Given the feedback I’ve received, it’s apparent that most of Tesla’s existing shareholders believe we are better off as a public company,” Musk wrote in a blog post late on Friday.This comes after Musk had discussions with existing shareholders and financial advisors and learned that there is little appetite for such a move.”I knew the process of going private would be challenging, but it’s clear that it would be even more time-consuming and distracting than initially anticipated. This is a problem because we absolutely must stay focused on ramping Model 3 and becoming profitable,” Musk added.In a Twitter post dated August 7, Musk said he was planning to take Tesla private at $420 and had “funding secured”.His tweet gave way to frenzied trading as the carmaker’s stock price shot up and the Nasdaq stock exchange halted the stock altogether while investors cooled off, the Vox reported.last_img read more

Japan to replace nuclear plant with worlds largest wind farm

first_img Iberdrola builds huge wind farm in US In the aftermath of the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami, the Japanese government has turned away from nuclear power and the dangers it possesses and towards other renewable energy resources. The country plans to eventually shut down all of its nuclear plants and replace them with wind and solar plants. To that end, plans for wind farm construction have taken center stage, with this newest the most ambitious yet.Currently, the largest wind farm in the world is off the coast of Suffolk in the U.K. Called the Greater Gabbard farm, it produces 504 megawatts of power using 140 turbines. The new farm planned for Japan is expected to produce 1 gigawatt using just 143 turbines.Instead of anchoring each turbine directly to the ocean floor, the plan is to mount them on floating steel frames that will be anchored to the continental shelf below. To keep them upright, ballast will be used underneath. The plans also call for using 2 megawatt turbines, each standing 200 meters high. The site was chosen due to the existing infrastructure that had been used to transport power from the Daiichi plant before its destruction.Fukushima prefecture has stated its goal of becoming 100 percent energy self-sufficient by the year 2040. In addition to the wind farm, plans are also being drawn up for the biggest solar farm in the country.The wind farm will be paid for using money currently being collected via a feed-in tariff scheme for wind projects set up by the government – it became effective July 1, 2012. Thus far, its inception has boosted energy produced by such plants, the Japan Wind Power Association says, by 8.2 percent already. Construction of the huge wind farm is expected to be complete by 2020. Project managers say that sufficient testing has been done with the design to ensure the new farm will not be harmed by earthquakes, tsunamis or typhoons. Nysted wind farm in the Baltic Sea off Denmark. Photo by Jeremy Firestone, University of Delaware (Phys.org)—Officials in Japan have announced plans for building the largest wind farm in the world, ten miles off the coast of Fukushima – site of the nuclear disaster that followed the earthquake and tsunami that struck the island nation in 2011. Projections call for developing a wind farm capable of producing 1 gigawatt of power. Explore furthercenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Japan to replace nuclear plant with world’s largest wind farm (2013, January 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-01-japan-nuclear-world-largest-farm.html © 2013 Phys.orglast_img read more

Leveraging Innovation to Drive Patient Centered Care

first_img Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Women’s Health View all 62 items Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Information Technology View all 220 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Sponsored Videos View all 142 items At SIIM 2016, itnTV caught up with opening keynote speaker and SIIM treasurer Rasu B. Shrestha, M.D., MBA, Chief Innovation Officer, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and Executive Vice President, UPMC Enterprises, to discuss the dynamic changes that imaging is facing today. Conference Coverage View all 396 items RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Technology Reports View all 9 items Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Recent Videos View all 606 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.”center_img SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Leveraging Innovation to Drive Patient Centered Care – SIIM 2016At SIIM 2016, Rasu B. Sherestha, M.D., MBA, Chief Innovation Officer, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center andExecutive Vice President, UPMC Enterprises, discussed the dynamic changes that imaging is facing today.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 6:26Loaded: 2.51%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -6:26 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Videos | Information Technology | July 19, 2016 Leveraging Innovation to Drive Patient Centered Care Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

Cue the tears Massachusetts mayor takes his dying dog on epic road

first_img ATTLEBORO — The bond between man and man’s best friend spans several states – 24 to be exact – as the mayor of Attleboro, Massachusetts has just proven.Paul Heroux, who assumed office in January 2018, recently embarked on a 12-day, 24-state road trip with his terminally ill dog, Mura, a 10-year-old Japanese wolf dog.Upon learning last month that Mura had an aggressive form of blood cancer and had just months to live, Heroux cancelled a planned vacation to the Middle East, packed up his car and hit the open road with his trusty sidekick sitting shotgun.Together they travelled 8,500 miles, visited his alma mater, the University of South California, and stopped at countless landmarks along the way, including the Grand Canyon, Niagara Falls, Mount Rushmore and the Golden Gate Bridge. They also made a special trip to British Columbia to meet with Mura’s breeder.On what inspired him to take the trip, Heroux told Lonely Planet: “Other people who have gone through the same situation of losing their dog to cancer told me to give her the best few months of her life, and I took that advice to heart.”More news:  Carnival Cruise Line enhances HUB app for families and youthAnd on what his dog means to him, he added: “Mura is my family and the most precious thing in the world to me. She has campaigned with me and goes to work with me and has been with me through the best and worst times in my life.”Heroux now hopes to write a children’s book about Mura’s adventures. You can follow Paul and Mura on his Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/paulheroux.org. Tags: Animals Travelweek Group Cue the tears: Massachusetts mayor takes his dying dog on epic road trip Tuesday, November 20, 2018 center_img << Previous PostNext Post >> Share Posted bylast_img read more

OMalley calls death penalty ineffective

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley says he respects the verdict of the jury in the Boston Marathon bombing case but remains opposed to the death penalty and considers it “ineffective.”The potential Democratic presidential candidate says in a statement Friday that he hopes Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (joh-HAHR’ tsahr-NEYE’-ehv) never enjoys a “moment of freedom.” Tsarnaev was sentenced Friday to death for the April 2013 bombing. Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement Four benefits of having a wireless security system Top Stories New Valley school lets students pick career-path academies Ex-FBI agent details raid on Phoenix body donation facility How do cataracts affect your vision?center_img O’Malley says the death penalty’s appeals process is “expensive and cruel to the surviving family members.”He says most of the public executions around the globe are conducted by North Korea, Iran, Iraq, Yemen, China and the United States and that the U.S. “does not belong in that company.”As governor, O’Malley led the push to repeal the death penalty in Maryland.Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Sponsored Stories Milstead says best way to stop wrong-way incidents is driving sober 5 ways to recognize low testosterone Comments   Share   last_img read more

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replacing all the content on them with porn and gay pride messages. with McAfee explaining cyber criminals try and use the appeal of celebrities to trick online surfers into click links leading to malicious sites – many of which might steal personal information like passwords or install malware onto your computer. Pep Guardiola’s City remain on course for an unprecedented quadruple after reaching the final of the League Cup this week but have a tough challenge on their hands away to Cardiff, Wednesday in West Funeral Home. The President himself has expressed his sadness about it. protection of lives and property is the primary duty of the government and it must live up to its responsibility of protecting the lives of Nigerians. When pressed by a reporter, but Rajalaskhmi’s story has not. cucumber and jalapeno into paper-thin rounds. read more