Month: September 2019

Donovan McNabb Denies Bullying Former Teammate

Former Philadelphia Eagles quarterback, Donovan McNabb has responded to claims from his ex-teammate, Shawn Andrews,  that he was a locker room bully. McNabb denied ever bullying Andrews.McNabb spoke to the Philadelphia Inquirer about the former offensive lineman’s allegations.“That is ridiculous. I don’t know what comments you expect to get from me, but that is news to me and completely false. For me to bully anybody, that sounds unbelievable,” he said.Earlier in the month, Andrews told an Arkansas magazine that his life was “a living hell” while playing with the Eagles because of McNabb.“He was a big part of it — he was a big part of my issues there,”  Andrews said. “Bully is a strong word, but he was degrading to me and spread rumors. It’s bothered me that I haven’t really spoken about it.”Andrews played six seasons with Philadelphia and seven in the NFL. He retired at age 28 after battling injuries and depression. He also made the Pro-Bowl three-times. read more

Womens swimming Buckeyes cruise to victory over Wright State look forward to

Ohio State women’s swim team competes against Wright State during a meet at the McCorkle Aquatic Pavilion on Feb. 3. Credit: Fallon Perl | Lantern reporterThe Ohio State women’s swimming team dominated in their final dual meet of the season with a score of 153-88, claiming first place in all but two events.Working to bounce back from a loss to Michigan last weekend, this victory over Wright State was a step in the right direction with just 12 days until the Big Ten Championships.“We’re kind of swimming off-events tonight, so it’s fun to just get up and race something different,” senior Kaitlyn Ferrara said. “Last week was a tough loss, but we all raced well … so we’re all looking forward to bringing it back for Big Tens.”Though the athletes may have been competing in races that they aren’t typically used to swimming, it served as a nice change of pace for the Buckeyes, Ferrara added.“It’s kind of good for Big Tens. The energy is not quite as hype, so it kind of gets you ready to race no matter what the situation is,” she said. “Every time you get up on the blocks is good practice for the end-of-the-season meet.”Senior Lindsey Clary said that the Big Tens will be an intense four days of swimming for the Buckeyes, and the last two dual meets have helped the team prepare for the challenges that lie ahead.“For conference, you kind of want to hit it at that peak physically, but that isn’t where we’re at right now and that’s okay,” Clary said. “Mentally, everyone is getting super excited. I think we’re all in a good spot and ready to be racing fast and racing for each other, and I think this meet is helping us with that.”The seniors concluded their final dual meet of their career at OSU. Clary, Ferrera, Taylor Vargo, Chantel Wynn, and Zulal Zeren were recognized for the past four years they dedicated to the program.Vargo and Clary finished their final dual meet with a couple of victories. Vargo recorded the fastest time for the Buckeyes in the 200-yard individual medley, finishing with a time of 2:06.78, while Clary finished with a winning time of 2:17.71 in the 200-yard breaststroke.The freshmen dazzled in a couple of races, showing promise for the future of the program. Kathrin Demler won both the 100- yard backstroke with a time of 56.44 seconds, as well as the 200-yard backstroke with a time of 2:01.08. Freshmen Devin Landstra also picked up a victory, touching the wall at 53.51 to win the 100-yard freestyle.Clary was overwhelmed with emotions as the team concluded the meet, but her focus remained on the conference championships.“Everyone was making bets that I was going to cry, but I’m excited. I’m happy to have my last meet with this group of girls,” Clary said. “It’s a really great group, and I’m excited to see what we can do in the next couple of weeks.”The Ohio State Winter Invitational will be held on Feb. 11-12 at the McCorkle Aquatic Pavilion, just before the team travels to West Lafayette, Indiana, for the Big Ten Championships, taking place from Feb. 15 to Feb. 18. read more

Buckeyes add pair of walkons to basketball squad

The Ohio State basketball team didn’t sign any new recruits for this season, but they did add two new players. In mid-October, the OSU basketball team held tryouts for new walk-ons to make the team. After all was said and done, two new walk-ons had impressed the coaching staff enough to earn a spot on the roster.Eddie Days, a 6-foot guard, and Dustin Reynolds, a 6-foot-6-inch forward, were the two players that made the team.“It was amazing. I‘ve always dreamed of playing here, playing at a big school like this and just being part of a great program,” Reynolds said. “I am living a dream every day, working hard and just trying to make the guys better.”Days also shared his excitement about making the team, the second time he has made the OSU roster.“I was real excited,” he said. “It’s something I’ve been working on since the beginning of the summertime.”   Days made the team two seasons ago, but could not stay on the team due to injuries. He is now healthy and ready to contribute. “I just want to fit in and become part of the team,” Days said. “I know my job; my job is to help out in practice and get those guys ready for the games.” The Cleveland native was a three-time letterwinner in basketball during high school at Richmond Heights. At OSU he will be a senior academically, but he will have two years left of eligibility to play basketball for the Buckeyes.  It was the first time going through the process for Reynolds. He played one season at Hillsdale College, but sat out last season with an injured back. Now injury-free, Reynolds will return to the basketball court wearing a Buckeye uniform. Reynolds led his high school team in scoring and rebounding. It was always his dream to play basketball for the Buckeyes, he said.In this first season with OSU, Reynolds will be red-shirted, since he transferred in to OSU from a different school. Under NCAA rules, a player who transfers between Division I schools must sit out a year. When he sees actual game action next season, he will have two years of eligibility remaining. This season, he will be a big part of helping the players get better at practice and preparing them for games. This same group of Buckeyes has been playing together for a year, so the players understand what it takes to win. Both walk-ons want to come in and fit into the system. They know their roles on this team and they just want to contribute to this already good basketball team. “I expect great things,” Reynolds said. “We’re having great practices and who knows, we’re just going to ride things out and see where it takes us.” read more

Commentary Big beards lead to playoff success

For sports fanatics all throughout the country, the months of April and May can deliver some of the most suspenseful and extraordinary performances of the year, with both the NBA and NHL playoffs under way. Over the past few years, a link between both sports is growing: the sudden appearance of facial hair during the playoffs. For even the most casual of hockey fans, this comes as no news. Growing a beard for the length of the playoffs has become more than a tradition for the athletes who play on ice. It is an unquestioned habit. According to John McGourty of the NHL’s official website, the 1980 New York Islanders were the original bearers of the playoff beard. Dave Lewis, a defenseman who was part of that team was quoted as saying, “It was part of the unity of our team, and I think we thought we probably looked a little more rugged with beards.” Whatever the reason, it sure worked. The Islanders won four consecutive Stanley Cups between 1980 and 1983. Then the tradition suddenly died. Eleven years later, the New Jersey Devils resurrected this tradition by dropping their razors, and, surely not by coincidence, they hoisted the Stanley Cup that year. Ever since, it has been practically an unspoken commandment for each player on a playoff-bound team to let the facial follicles run wild until they either win or are eliminated. Of course, this often can result in some of the most hilarious excuses for beards (refer to Jonathan Toews circa 2010, Sidney Crosby circa whenever). In 2006, the trend seemed to have reached the hardwood, as then-Cleveland Cavalier Zydrunas Ilgauskas and another player, who shall remain unnamed, decided to give the tradition a shot. However, the following year Ilgauskas decided not to bring back the beard, alluding to itchiness and spousal criticism as his main reasons. (On a side note, it should be known that Cleveland did not win a championship in 2006, likely because of the fact that only a small handful of the players on the team were sporting face carpets, violating a critical rule in the code of playoff beard-ism.) In March, the Memphis Grizzlies organization decided they would adopt this tradition and, according to their team website, plan on giving out prizes to fans who join the players in foregoing shaving. The potential strength of playoff beard unity was on full display this past week as the eighth-seeded Grizzlies upset the heavily favored San Antonio Spurs, who were not sporting any more facial hair than usual. An integral part of the bearded bunch in Memphis, Tenn., is former Ohio State basketball star Mike Conley Jr., who played on the 2007 Buckeyes team that went to the National Championship. This superstition is not limited to the ice and hardwood. Aaron Rodgers and Ben Roethlisberger both lead their teams to the Super Bowl with strong arms and even stronger sets of facial hair. Those who have undergone this tradition, whether for unity, superstition or some other unknown reason, are not truly given enough credit. For the victors of the NHL playoffs, the razor is ignored for upward of three months. Three months without a shave. In just a few weeks, the beard becomes not only a burden for the bearers, but for their wives and children as well. Washington Capitals defenseman Karl Alzner recently told the National Post that his “lady almost shaved (his) beard off, because she didn’t really like it too much.” Luckily for Alzner and the rest of the Capitals, he quickly stopped her from doing so. Naturally, his team remains in the playoffs. The commitment these fierce and fuzzy athletes undergo each spring simply for a bit of good karma has certainly become the most underappreciated tradition in all of sports. The playoff beard tradition transcends race. It has made an appearance in nearly every major sport in not only our country, but numerous countries across the world. Playoff beards are apparently no longer even exclusive to the athletically gifted, as thousands of fans ditch their razors to display support. This hairy phenomenon has transcended virtually every barrier, aside from gender. Nevertheless, I find myself quite content with that. read more

Commentary Academics help Ohio State football programs image

Amid the biggest scandal in the football program’s history, there is a silver lining for the Ohio State athletic department. A record 523 scholar-athletes were honored Monday night for academic achievements, including 40 from the “corrupt” football program. Cornerback Chimdi Chekwa, who was drafted by the Oakland Raiders on April 30, was one of five male finalists for the Big Ten Medal of Honor for his success as an honors student in accounting and his on-field play. OSU football also was honored by the NCAA on May 17, receiving public-recognition awards for the team’s academic progress rate from 2006–10. These awards are given to teams in the top 10 percent in each sport. OSU football was one of 14 BCS schools that received this award. Northwestern was the only other Big Ten school to earn it. Four other sports at OSU — baseball, men’s gymnastics and men’s and women’s tennis also were awarded for their academic progress rates. For all the trouble the athletic department and football program are in, the coaches of each team have obviously set high academic standards for their players. Absent from the list of BCS schools honored are football powerhouse schools from the SEC. The only SEC school honored was Vanderbilt, far from a contender in the conference. OSU’s multiyear APR is 985, 15 points short of a perfect 1,000 and 36 points higher than the average of all Football Bowl Subdivision schools. That the football team has attended a BCS bowl each of the past five seasons and that its players have exceeded 90 percent of FBS schools in the classroom, is unbelievable — despite the controversy surrounding the program. Since 2006, the lowest score coach Jim Tressel and his football team received in the single-year APR is 984, which is still in the top 10 percent of all FBS schools. In the same amount of time, Alabama coach Nick Saban has achieved a single-year APR of more than 980 just once. In 2007-08 he recorded a score of 936. Tressel has been both a winner at OSU and a mentor beyond football. When evaluating The Vest’s job status and his body of work, it is important to remember he has made sure his players lived up to their title of student-athlete. read more

Nurse spared jail over fatal blood transfusion blunder

first_imgMr Huseyin was a much-loved husband, father and grandfather – a kind, considerate family man whose death has devastated his family, particularly his wife, who feels so alone without him after all these yearsJudge Nicholas Loraine-Smith The court was packed with the nurse's friends and family Ledesma initially tried to pass off the error as being a colleague’s mistake and only when questioned further did she admit to being distracted and flustered when checking the patient’s details.Anthony Metzer, defending, described the case as a “double tragedy” and said she is “anxious to accept full blame” and had shown extreme remorse.”Even to this day I don’t think there’s anything I can point to as to how it was that this tragic and serious error came about,” he added.”This will live with her until her own dying day,” Mr Metzer said.Judge Nicholas Loraine-Smith said: “Mr Huseyin was a much-loved husband, father and grandfather – a kind, considerate family man whose death has devastated his family, particularly his wife, who feels so alone without him after all these years.”It’s still a mystery to me as to how and why you came to behave in the way that you did, and you remain certain that the details of the other Mr Hussain were shown on the deceased’s monitor and I cannot exclude that as a contributory factor.”The judge said he had “rarely, if ever” seen so many character references and letters of support for a defendant and continued: “You were committed to that unit, everybody talks about how reliable you were, how committed.”You were described as the mother of the unit and always prepared to go the extra mile for your patients.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The court was packed with the nurse’s friends and familyCredit: PA Archive/PA Images Ledesma, of Stevenage in Hertfordshire, wept and hugged her family after the sentence was passed on Thursday.The public gallery was packed with dozens of her family, friends and former hospital colleagues, many of whom wrote letters of support to the court.They formed a circle in court and prayed after the judge announced she would not be going to prison.Mr Huseyin had been in the care of Ledesma after a successful heart bypass operation in May 2014.He was given the wrong blood type in a transfusion on May 7 2014 and died later the same day.A number of errors on Ledesma’s part saw her choose the wrong blood from a vending style machine, before checking it against the wrong computer records. A blundering nurse whose patient died after she gave him the wrong type of blood has been spared jail.Lea Ledesma made a series of mistakes which led to Ali Huseyin, 76, being given type AB blood during a transfusion even though he was blood group O.The 49-year-old nurse, who was described as the “mother” of the intensive care unit at London Heart Hospital where she had worked since 2001, then tried to blame a colleague for the mistake.She was given an 18-month suspended sentence at Southwark Crown Court after previously being convicted of unlawful manslaughter by gross negligence.last_img read more

Heartbreaking photo of father dying of cancer cradling his young son

first_img Show more Group shows Jon Strawson with children Freya, seven, George, six, and Henry, four He said; “If you relapse from a stem cell transplant in the first six months your chances of survival are pretty poor. Doctors have never known anyone to be cured from the relapse I have.”I was told I could either go home and receive palliative care and I could be dead within weeks, or try the option of intensive chemotherapy to give me a second chance of remission.”However, there’s a 10 per risk of dying because the chemotherapy is so intense and there’s a 10 per cent risk that my bone marrow will never recover. Group shows Jon Strawson with children Freya, seven, George, six, and Henry, fourCredit:SWNS But speaking from his hospital bed, Mr Strawson, who received his first chemotherapy dose earlier this month, said he had to try everything. Jon Strawson with his son George “But being given weeks to live is not long enough. I owe it to my three children to prolong things for longer if nothing else. Hopefully I will go back into remission again.”Being told what I have is not the easiest thing to take in and I’ve had to have some horrible conversations.”My children know I’m ill again and I’m back in hospital but that’s the extent they have been told.”Mr Strawson has been told if his current treatment doesn’t work he may only have a few weeks left to live.He added: “The chance of it working for my blood cancer AML, especially after relapse, are next to nothing.”No further treatment will be recommended because of the short amount of time from transplant to the relapse.”I have three young children so this prognosis is unacceptable. I am not ready to just roll over and die. I owe it to my children and my family to exhaust every avenue.”center_img And he has released this moving image of him embracing his son George who cuddles up with him after his latest round of chemotherapy at the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital.Mr Strawson, who lives near Crediton, Devon, was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) on his 33rd birthday last year on July 21.Following months of unsuccessful treatments, including a stem cell transplant at Derriford Hospital in Plymouth, his last option is a course of intensive chemotherapy at the Royal Devon & Exeter Hospital.Recovery at his stage of the disease is so low that he has not been given odds to indicate what chance there is of it working.And even if he does show signs of improvement, he has been warned he could remain in hospital for the next six months while his body recovers. Mr Strawson is appealing for people to come forward with suggestions of physical, mental, medical or holistic care, as well as information about any new drug treatments, especially those aimed at relapsed AML patients.He has asked anyone who can help to contact him on email at ray.jon@hotmail.com This heartbreaking photo shows a cancer-stricken young father with just weeks left to live cradling his son on his hospital bed.Brave dad-of-three Jon Strawson, 33, has advanced blood cancer and has been told by doctors there is nothing left they can do for him.But he is refusing to “roll over and die” and has issued a last ditch plea for anyone to get in touch to offer him help or advice.Mr Strawson said he won’t give up for the sake of his family – Freya, seven, George, six, and Henry, four, and wife Rachel, 30. Jon Strawson with his son GeorgeCredit:SWNS Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Charles I art collection reunited for first time in 350 years as

first_imgHe said: “I’m very gamekeeper, because the Royal Collection generally doesn’t borrow, we lend, whereas the Royal Academy is almost entirely poacher, so we sort of understand it from both points of view.”My presence there reminds colleagues in other institutions that the Royal Collection has in the past been a generous lender. “No institution would do a reciprocal arrangement, but we have in the past been very generous, for which these institutions are very grateful.” Queen Henrietta Maria with Sir Jeffrey Hudson, 1633, by Sir Anthony van Dyck, which is in the new exhibition Charles I: King and Collector Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Many of the pieces were regained by Charles II following the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, but some of them have never come back to England. Some of the most celebrated pieces include four Mortlake tapestries of Raphael’s Acts of the Apostles which have been kept in the Mobilier National in Paris.Two Titian pieces have also been retrieved, the Supper at Emmaus, from the Louvre in Paris, and Charles V with a Dog, from the Museo del Prado in Madrid. Desmond Shawe-Taylor, Surveyor Of The Queen’s Pictures, said he and Per Rumberg, curator of the RAA, had not had any trouble persuading the foreign curators to give up the paintings.He said: “The key thing in any negotiation is really to remember that the person making the decision is also a curator, and is therefore as enthusiastic about curatorial projects as the person asking for the loan.”All the curators that we spoke to were fascinated by the subject and therefore found themselves personally as scholars inclining toward the loan.”He added that the Royal Collection’s previous generosity had persuaded some museums to relent. Queen Henrietta Maria with Sir Jeffrey Hudson, 1633, by Sir Anthony van Dyck, which is in the new exhibition Charles I: King and CollectorCredit:Anthony van Dyck/Royal Academy of Arts/PA Wirecenter_img He had been a prolific collector of art, amassing 2,000 pieces including 1,500 paintings and 500 sculptures, dating from the fifteenth to the seventeenth century. But just months after his execution, the King’s collection had been scattered across Europe by his successor Cromwell, offered for sale and as diplomatic gifts to foreign states.  The exhibition will run in tandem with a display of the arts bought and commissioned by Charles II, at the Queen’s Gallery, in Buckingham Palace, which will run from December to May. The BBC is also planning a four-part TV series to be broadcast on BBC Four and presented by Andrew Graham-Dixon, examining the Royal Collection. Among the pieces examined by the art historian will be 4,000 prints and photographs of Raphael frescoes commissioned by Prince Albert in the 19th century.  They were confiscated by Oliver Cromwell and scattered all over the world. But some of the most famous pieces in King Charles I’s art collection are set to be reunited for the first time since the 17th century in an exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts. Curators from the Queen’s Gallery, based at Buckingham Palace, and the Royal Academy, have spent two years travelling Europe to persuade some of its most distinguished galleries to let their art travel back to England. The pieces which are set to return for the exhibition from January until April next year include an image of the King with his horse, which will be shown alongside two other equestrian portraits of Charles I. Van Dyck’s Charles I (Le Roi a la Chasse) which came from the Louvre and will be in England for the first time since the 17th century, is the Dutch artist’s most celebrated portait of the King. Around 20 of the 150 works in the Charles I exhibition are from foreign museums and haven’t been back to the UK since the 17th century when they were sold or sent abroad by Oliver Cromwell. Following defeat in the English Civil War, Charles I was deposed in 1649 and sentenced to death by Parliament on 27 January. last_img read more

Fitbits are way off the mark when calculating weight loss study finds

first_imgThe volunteers wore the seven devices while walking or running on treadmills or using exercise bikes. Each volunteer’s heart was measured with a medical-grade electrocardiograph (ECG).Metabolic rate was estimated with an instrument for measuring the oxygen and carbon dioxide in breath. Results from the wearable devices were then compared to the measurements from the two “gold standard” instruments.Prof Ashley said: “The heart rate measurements performed far better than we expected, but the energy expenditure measures were way off the mark.”The magnitude of just how bad they were surprised me.”He said the message from the findings is that a user can “pretty much rely on” a fitness tracker’s heart rate measurements.But he said basing the number of doughnuts you eat on how many calories your device says you burned is a “really bad idea.”The researchers couldn’t be sure why energy-expenditure measures were so far off. They said each device uses its own proprietary algorithm for calculating energy expenditure.Ms Shcherbina said it’s likely the algorithms are making assumptions that don’t fit individuals very well, adding: “All we can do is see how the devices perform against the gold-standard clinical measures.”My take on this is that it’s very hard to train an algorithm that would be accurate across a wide variety of people because energy expenditure is variable based on someone’s fitness level, height and weight, et cetera.”She said heart rate is measured directly, whereas energy expenditure must be measured indirectly through proxy calculations. Trendy fitness trackers like Fitbits do not work on overweight people and are “way off the mark” when calculating weight loss, according to new research.Scientists set out to measure the accuracy of wristband activity trackers – including Fitbit and Apple Watch – worn by millions of people to monitor their own exercise and health.They found that if the device measures heart rate, it is probably doing a good job. The Google nexus phone with the FitBit app The Google nexus phone with the FitBit appCredit: Heathcliff O’Malley Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The Fitbit BlazeCredit: But if it measures energy expenditure, it’s probably out by a “significant” amount, according to the study by researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine in the US. An evaluation of seven devices in a group of 60 volunteers showed that six of the devices measured heart rate with an error rate of less than five per cent.The team evaluated the Apple Watch, Basis Peak, Fitbit Surge, Microsoft Band, Mio Alpha 2, PulseOn and the Samsung Gear S2.Some devices were more accurate than others, and factors such as skin colour and body mass index affected the measurements, according to the researchers.But the study found that none of the seven devices measured energy expenditure accurately. The Fitbit Blaze Even the most accurate device was out by an average of 27 per cent while the least accurate was off by 93 per cent, according to the findings published by the Journal of Personalised Medicine.The study’s senior author Professor Euan Ashley said: “People are basing life decisions on the data provided by these devices.”But he said consumer devices aren’t held to the same standards as medical-grade devices, and it’s hard for doctors to know what to make of heart-rate data and other figures from a patient’s wearable device.Prof Ashley said: “Manufacturers may test the accuracy of activity devices extensively, but it’s difficult for consumers to know how accurate such information is or the process that the manufacturers used in testing the devices.”He and his colleagues set out to independently evaluate activity trackers that met criteria such as measuring both heart rate and energy expenditure and being commercially available.Co lead author graduate student Anna Shcherbina said: “For a lay user, in a non-medical setting, we want to keep that error under 10 per cent.”last_img read more

Christmas turkeys make a break for it after trailer overturns and one

first_imgA vegan campaigner who calls himself ‘Earthling Ed’ wrote on Facebook: “Activist refused to move away from this turkey.”Police and workers have given up and released him to us. We are now on our way to a sanctuary with him.”Many of the animals were injured or killed in the crash, and police tried to get protesters to stay away while the surviving turkeys were collected. Campaigners said this bird has now been named Asha Scores of turkeys made a break for it after a trailer transporting them on the M5 turned over.The load overturned on the A38 in Wychbold, Worcester, on Thursday at around 10am.Vegan activities on the scene attempted to prevent the farmer from retrieving the birds, who were fated to be killed for Christmas meals across the country.Despite their efforts, most of the turkeys were loaded back onto trailers and sent off to be slaughtered.One turkey, however, was saved after a woman refused to move away from it.The farmer gave up in the end and let the activists keep the bird. A spokesperson for West Mercia Police said in a statement: “At approximately 10am this morning, West Mercia Police were called to reports of an overturned trailer containing turkeys on J5 of the M5/A38.”Highways England, the fire and rescue service and the ambulance service were also in attendance. There were no reported injuries. The rest of the turkeys were loaded back onto the trailer The rest of the turkeys were loaded back onto the trailerCredit:Facebook/Earthling Ed Campaigners said this bird has now been named AshaCredit:Facebook/Yvonne Szachulska Turkeys on the looseCredit:Earthling Ed/Facebook “RSPCA were also called to the scene, a number of turkeys died as a result of the incident. The road has now reopened.”‘Once recovery was completed and emergency services ensured that members of the public and animals were safe, the remaining turkeys were handed back to their owner.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Turkeys on the loose Earthling Ed can be seen in video footage arguing with police officers and firefighters and asked how they can “morally justify” allowing these animals to be “killed needlessly.”He said: “Meet Asha (meaning hope), or Ash for short. In the early hours of this morning Ash was crammed into a crate and piled onto a truck that began its drive to the slaughterhouse. On the way the truck overturned, crashing and therefore crushing and killing turkeys. “The turkeys that survived were violently thrown back into crates, picked up by their legs and wings and shoved onto a different truck that came to collect them for ‘processing’. They have been slaughtered for food now, people will actually eat the bodies of the traumatised birds that survived this crash.”We arrived at the crash site to rescue the injured birds. We were refused, we were laughed at, but we stood our ground.”One activist, my good friend Katie, cradled one of the confused and distressed turkeys and wouldn’t let the police or the workers take him to his death. Eventually they gave up and the ‘owner’ (you can’t own a life) of the birds said we could ‘relinquish his property’ and take the turkey. Turkeys are not property, they are individuals and they certainly do not exist on this earth for humans to eat their bodies for Christmas dinner.”last_img read more