One-third drop in Enterprise Ireland-supported companies in Donegal

first_imgThere has been a one-third drop in Enterprise Ireland supported companies and one thousand less jobs in Donegal since 2001.Donegal Sinn Féin Senator Pádraig Mac Lochlainn has today revealed that there has been a huge drop of one third in Enterprise Ireland supported companies in Donegal since 2001, from 194 then to 125 today.“Since 2001, across Ireland, jobs at Enterprise Ireland supported companies have grown by one third but here in Donegal, we are down a thousand jobs,” Senator Mac Lochlainn said. He has also revealed that today there are more than 1000 less jobs in Enterprise Ireland supported companies than there were in 2001 (dropping from 4581 to 3552). This news follows recent revelations from Senator Mac Lochlainn that the growth in IDA supported jobs in Donegal since 2000 is less than half the national average. He also revealed that the IDA support less companies today in Donegal (12) than they did in 2000 (14). Two of those companies, Pramerica and Optum (United Health Group) employ more than two thirds of the total IDA supported jobs in Donegal.Senator Mac Lochlainn said: “When I revealed the shocking IDA figures for Donegal a few weeks back, I described them as “a story of government failure” and “ a story of lost prosperity for the people of Donegal”. These Enterprise Ireland figures are even more shocking. Since 2001, across Ireland, jobs at Enterprise Ireland supported companies has grown by one third but here in Donegal, we are down a thousand jobs.“All of this must now be a serious wake up call for the Government and the job creation agencies “The context of my questions to the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation, Heather Humphreys and these revelations is that back in July 1999, the report from the Donegal Employment Initiative Task Force targeted 4,750 new jobs for Donegal in Foreign Direct Investment and Internationally Traded Services over the following seven years. The Task Force, led by the then County Manager, Michael McLoone had been established by the Government following the loss of over 1,000 jobs in Donegal’s textile industry at the time.“This report was launched just over a year after the Good Friday Agreement that heralded a new era of peace on the island of Ireland. So the Task Force’s job targets for Donegal reflected a time of hope and post- conflict ambition”.“The reality is that rather than catch up with the rest of Ireland in job creation over these years, Donegal has fallen even further behind. This is a true scandal.I am calling on Minister Humphreys to urgently meet with the IDA and Enterprise Ireland and for both agencies to then outline their plan to reverse this neglect and to deliver investment and job creation fairness to the people of Donegal.“I am also again demanding the fast tracking of all funding commitments made to the people of Donegal and the North West under the Project 2040- The National Planning Framework. Investment in roads, bridges, airports, water infrastructure, harbours, and broadband all need to be moved forward”.Table 1: Employment in Enterprise Ireland supported companies in Donegal across the period 2001 – 2017CountyDonegalYearTotal Jobs2001458120024486200339322004376120053744200638172007394920083719200933742010335320113518201233612013334220143302201535672016358120173552Source of data: Annual Employment Survey 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005,2006, 2007,2008,2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017.Table 2: Number of plants in Donegal supported by Enterprise Ireland across the period 2001 – 2017.CountyDonegalAES dataNo. of Plants20011942002197200319220041892005193200619220071972008184200918820101822011181201218020131652014144201514220161392017125Source of data: Annual Employment Survey 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005,2006, 2007,2008,2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017.— One-third drop in Enterprise Ireland-supported companies in Donegal was last modified: April 30th, 2018 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img

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