Tag Archives: 上海夜网论坛

QPR fans on Twitter react to Onuoha verdict

first_imgQPR fans on Twitter have been reacting to the news that skipper Nedum Onuoha will be suspended for the New Year’s Eve game against Wolves after an appeal against his red card at Brighton was rejected.Many supporters were unhappy with the verdict. However, Onuoha has attracted criticism from fans this season – and some were far from unhappy that he will now be unavailable.And some were also unimpressed by manager Ian Holloway’s warning that Rangers “haven’t got a back four” without Onuoha because Joel Lynch and Steven Caulker have also been [email protected] actually not bothered as I think he’s pony, just a shame it’s now with no real backup, harsh decision in the first place..— Lee Reynolds (@miniwren) December 29, 2016Excellent news, his lack of leadership won’t be missed on the pitch, the Loftus Road squirrel has better leadership qualities! https://t.co/KRgfCXYM4x— Lloydy (@TheGarwBoy) December 29, [email protected] You ain’t gotta back four, full stop mate. Bet Caulker will do well again once he leaves ..— Lager Lout (@lagerlout1966) December 29, [email protected] we don’t have a back four full stop Ian. And we’re also in trouble with or without him— Ben Ingram (@BenIngram3) December 29, [email protected] we don’t have a back 4 with Onuoha so nothing new— Steve (@QPRSteve1982) December 29, [email protected] and Sick note Caulker whatever happened to him just stick smithies centre half been covering all season anyway #woeful— David R block (@237tothebush) December 29, [email protected] stop making excuses before the game and just get on with it!— Neil Crawshaw (@NeilCrawshaw) December 30, 2016   Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x Drink This Before Bed, Watch Your Body Fat Melt Like Crazy x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Sharks hit sour note, as Blues find a rhythm

first_imgSAN JOSE — There was too much hope in the Sharks’ game Monday night.They hoped their forecheck could create pressure. They hoped scoring chances would follow. They hoped they could take a 2-0 series lead over the St. Louis Blues in the Western Conference Final.Ultimately, though, the Blues showed why they entered this series with a 5-1 record on the road in these playoffs, as they got a couple goals from unlikely sources and outworked the Sharks for a 4-2 win at SAP Center. The Sharks and …last_img read more

Monkeys Have No Ear for Music

first_imgConsonance and dissonance have no meaning to monkeys, studies have shown.  Nature Science Update reported on experiments on cotton-top tamarins showing that, unlike humans, they do not find consonant tones more pleasing than dissonant ones.“If you want to look at the evolution of music it’s important to do these types of studies,” says Laurel Trainor, a neuroscientist at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada. She adds that this research supports the idea that humans have a special preference for consonance, one of the most basic structural elements of music.  This could account for the fact that as far as we know, only humans produce songs simply for enjoyment, she says.How this accounts for the dissonance in pop music among humans was not explained, but the report suggests that “musicality may be restricted to humans alone.”   Cotton-top tamarins may resemble some youth of today, but without literature, semantic language, music or art, it looks like their monkey culture is pretty undeveloped.  They might relate to rap, which is more on their level, but even the Monkees seems too highfalutin for their taste.    Listen to a symphony orchestra, or watch any group of talented musicians play finely-crafted instruments or sing, and ask yourself where is any evidence that music evolved from our primate ancestors.  Trainor should have said, “If you want to disprove the evolution of music, it’s important to do these types of studies.”  Only humans make true concordant music and only humans appreciate it.  Music is one of those things that humans don’t need for survival, but just enjoy.  It is a gift of God.  Let every heart prepare Him room, and heav’n and nature sing.(Visited 18 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Pens for needy children

first_imgFor many South African children, starting the school year with an assortment of stationery goodies is considered a luxury. (Image: Tynago Communications) BiC will donate one-million pens to needy South African children by March 2012 as part of its Choose BiC and Change a Future campaign. (Image: Tynago Communications) MEDIA CONTACTS • Millicent Quoilin  Unilever   +27 11 474 0181RELATED ARTICLES • Education goes mobile with Vodacom • Education boost for Gauteng • SA businesses urged to adopt schools • Teacher laptops to enhance education • Zuma: SA to meet 2015 education goalWilma den HartighFrench-based company BiC, best known for its iconic ballpoint pen, has pledged to donate one-million pens to needy South African children by March 2012 as part of its Choose BiC and Change a Future campaign.For many South African children, starting the school year with an assortment of stationery goodies is considered a luxury. Many children go to school without even the most basic stationery items such as pens.Through the campaign, BiC wants to give children the tools they need to help them on their way to becoming South Africa’s future teachers, engineers, doctors and lawyers.“It’s our way of using our brand’s power to champion education and to equip and empower the children who need it most,” says Millicent Quoilin, BiC marketing manager of stationery.How you can helpBiC’s new campaign hopes to change this and it has invited companies and consumers to join them in making a difference.Over 20 different BiC products have been branded with ‘Choose BiC and Change a Future’ stickers. Each time one of these packs is sold, BiC will donate a pen to a disadvantaged child.As part of the campaign, BiC will also give away cash prizes towards education, as well as iPads.Distributing the pensThe pens will be distributed by the READ Educational Trust, an NGO that operates in the education and literacy sectors.The organisation’s main focus is teacher training and school resource provision.It is funded by foreign donors and the private sector and works with the Department of Education to implement teacher training and literacy projects in schools.Bertus Matthee, national director of the READ Educational Trust, says that providing school children with writing tools is as important as having books to read.“Being able to put one’s thoughts down is the start of a good education,” Matthee said in a statement. “Since today’s pupils are those who will be writing South Africa’s future, the significance of a donation such as this cannot be underestimated.”Advancing educationLiteracy is a major challenge for South Africa and the country’s Department of Basic Education has identified education as a priority area.“Based on Unicef’s belief that education breaks the generational cycles of poverty and disease, BiC’s ‘Choose BiC and Change a Future campaign’ could begin to rewrite the history of education in South Africa,” Quoilin says.According to Unicef, 21 African nations have adult literacy rates below 50% and in sub-Saharan Africa alone, about 45-million children don’t go to school.Official figures show that about 4.7-million adults in South Africa are illiterate. The country’s unemployment rate of 24% is among the highest in the world.Tertiary institutions have also come on board to address South Africa’s literacy challenge.Last year Stellenbosch University launched a new initiative, known as Words Open Worlds, which is distributing books in rural and disadvantaged communities. Since the beginning of 2011, the project has reached around 30 000 people.last_img read more

Gift of the Givers: 25 years of philanthropy: Emily Thomas

first_imgIn a series of five articles, we share stories from Gift of the Givers volunteers in their own words as the organisation marks its 25th year of serving humanity. Emily Thomas, who works in logistics, tells us about what she does.Bringing water to the thirsty, Emily Thomas helping with drought relief programme in the Free State. (Image: Gift of the Givers)Sulaiman PhilipEmily Thomas: LogisticsI had just returned from leave in January 2016 when I was asked to go to Bloemfontein to help with our drought relief programme, where we distributed thousands of litres of water to communities around the Free State. It was really so sad to see people queue from five in the morning hoping that a water truck would come pass. Elderly people had to pay someone to fetch them buckets of water; children in creche were forced to carry two litres of water for the day.Listening to farmers when we brought them animal feed moved me. They would speak of how they ploughed and planted in hope and how they lost it all as the drought went on. I could feel and see the heartache and pain this drought visited on them.Listening to farmers talking about having to kill their animals brought home the despair people live with. (Image: Gift of the Givers)The animals were thin, sickly and dying. To remove yourself is a coping mechanism and I kept thinking about how this would affect the price of meat. Then you listen to the farmers tell you how hard it was to shoot their animals because they could not stand to see their suffering, and you realise the despair and hopelessness they live with. This donation of animal feed brought them new hope. The drought was an act of God, but through us He brought hope.I am a Gift of the Givers employee and I’m on call 24/7, but I see this as a calling, not a job. I have been doing this for so long – for nine years – and I have learnt that every distribution or disaster comes with its own unique challenges. It’s my responsibilty to make sure that logistics are in place and to be aware of the things that could possibley go wrong.On my first mission I thought of none of that; I was thinking only that our donations were going to make people’s hearts happy. Then the reality of the amount of work and planning that goes into every distribution or mission dawns on you. I work with an incredibly experienced team that helps to ensure that everything runs smoothly and without any security hazards.When people ask I always tell them my journey with Gift of the Givers started as an intervention by God. When I think of who we are and what it is we do I am filled with pride. We are an organisation that brings hope and restores dignity to people’s lives. I lost my job in June 2008. I remember I was standing outside when two gentlemen stopped to talk to me. We prayed together and one of them said: “In a month from now God will give you a job.”Exactly a month later I was planning to spend the day in bed because I was so depressed about still being unemployed when I got a call from my priest, Reverend Eve. Some flats close our church in Mayfair had burnt down and she wanted me to help with the residents. I could not tell her I was still in bed feeling sorry for myself, instead I jumped up and got ready.The Gift of the Givers were there as well and we all worked to determine what the residents immediate needs were. I accompanied Uncle (Badr) Allaudin to the warehouse to get some food and basic hygiene products. When he heard I was unemployed he asked me to accompany him to Orlando in Soweto to distribute food and blankets.In Orlando he asked me to say a few words and, not knowing anything about the organisation, I shyly and nervously read the Gift of the Givers brochure and ended with a prayer. Driving back Uncle Allaudin simply said: “I don’t think Im going to let you go, I want you to join the foundation.”Read the next profile on Ahmed Bham who heads the search and rescue department of Gift of the Givers.Our first profile was on medical co-ordinator, Dr YM Essack. Click here to read more.To find out how beekeeper, Owen Williams, has contributed to the organisation, click here.Orthopaedic surgeon, Dr Livan Meneses-Turino, shares his experience in Nepal, Haiti, and Palestine.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Give youth a voice

first_imgSacred Heart College pupil, Masego Mafata urged South Africans to give youth a voice.(Image: Shamin Chibba) IkamvaYouth’s Gauteng regional director, Patrick Mashanda, said the media must celebrate South Africa’s achievements.(Image: Shamin Chibba) Documentary filmmaker Khanyisile Magubane said the media sets the agenda for youth’s aspirations.(Image: Shamin Chibba)Shamin ChibbaSouth Africa’s future hinges on today’s youth, and their concerns need to be heard if we are to prosper. This was one of the major outcomes of the Johannesburg leg of the National Development Plan (NDP) Youth Dialogues hosted by the Mail & Guardian newspaper and Brand South Africa.Education, youth unemployment, and the role of the media were debated at the event, which was held at the Hyatt Hotel in Rosebank on 26 June. Panellists looked at how youth could engage with the NDP, and one way this could occur, they concluded, was by giving young people a chance to voice their concerns on matters affecting their lives.Godfrey Phetla, the director of policy and research for the Enterprise Development Unit in the Department of Trade and Industry, said the government must create the platform for youth to express themselves, and must seriously consider what they had to say. “We always have to speak on behalf of young people. We are not giving them a voice. This is where we have gone wrong as a country.”One of the young audience members, Masego Mafata, a pupil at Sacred Heart College in Johannesburg, urged society to give young people the chance to speak. “Most of the time people do not really get our perspective.”And Langalethu Manqele, the chairperson of the Johannesburg branch of the Black Management Forum (BMF), encouraged young people to use their energy, passion and questioning nature to make the future favourable for them. “They have a unique energy and value system the rest of the population does not have. They need to bring that energy with them to turn things around or else society will always arrest them.” Entrepreneurship the answerEntrepreneurship was put forward as a solution to the country’s rising youth unemployment figures, which, according to the latest Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) report on South Africa, was 48% at present. The president of the Junior Chamber International South Africa, Angel Kgokolo, opened the debate by saying enterprise development was important in addressing inequality and to achieve the transformation that was needed to secure a future for young citizens.GEM’s Entrepreneurial Framework Conditions had to be promoted, which would ensure the needs of young businesspeople were met. These conditions include the cultural and social norms of a country, market dynamics, research, development and education.The GEM report states that just 40% of South Africans believe they are capable of being entrepreneurs, well below the 52% average of similar efficiency-driven economies. It adds that the country’s education, which is one of the framework conditions, has affected the vastly negative perceptions people have of their entrepreneurial capability. “Education was given the lowest mean score by the national experts, indicating that South Africa’s education system is not effectively developing individuals with the skills and confidence required to consider entrepreneurship as a valid career choice,” the report states.Only 14% of South Africans intend to pursue business opportunities in the next three years, which is lower than the average of 27% for efficiency-driven countries. Kgokolo pointed out that a number of young start-ups were unprepared and were set up to fail. “They do not have the capacity to face the challenges of being entrepreneurs.”The founder of recycled products manufacturer Eco Smart, Lisa Kuhle, said this was due to a lack of mentorship. Businesses, she added, failed because there was no support. “Starting a business out of poverty is almost impossible. There are [high] costs to incur.” She suggested the government and corporates contributed by supporting small businesses run by young entrepreneurs.Matsi Modise, the national executive director of South African Black Entrepreneurs Forum, felt it was important for the government and business to work together to ensure young entrepreneurs had access to opportunities. “The government does play its part and has put together policies. But any environment must have a cohesive effort.”However, the BMF’s Manqele thought entrepreneurship was over-emphasised and that there were other solutions to unemployment. He said the country should rather deal with its skills shortage by encouraging young people to get educated. “Not all of us can own and run businesses. We need scientists, too. It is much harder to escape poverty via a business because you need networks. People who have these networks are insiders.”Erica Kempken, a senior consultant at ProServ South Africa, said all additional skills one would need to thrive in the workplace were not taught in schools. “We can teach so many more skills than we are currently doing.”Education, Kempken insisted, started in early childhood and the “NDP is incredibly clear about how important that is”. Furthermore, she said, creativity should be encouraged in the classroom and that it needed to be harnessed in a guided fashion. Schools first needed to teach children skills and afterwards allow them to “put it into practice in a creative way”. Media shapes youthAccording to journalist and documentary filmmaker Khanyisile Magubane, young South Africans are becoming media savvy and are quickly understanding its power. “The knowledge base an average 13-year-old has now is way more than a 13-year-old from 20 years ago. Technology has played a big role in that.”As a result, Magubane believed the media set the agenda for the youth’s aspirations – the way they reflected themselves had a lot to do with the way the media portrayed them. “If you look at the programming on radio and television aimed at young people, it is shallow, it dumbs down the minds of young people. So the question we should be asking is which young minds are going to play a role in shaping the National Development Plan.”She said the media could play a beneficial role in developing the youth by telling stories that portrayed young people who were affirmed in their families. She referred to the SABC 1 television drama Skeem Saam as a good example of how this could be achieved. “[The show] traces how families deal with [problems]. You see [situations] where families are saying to their children ‘You have messed up but it is not the end of the world’. That child walks away with an understanding that ‘I have made a mistake but I can learn from it.’”Patrick Mashanda, the Gauteng regional co-ordinator of the education development NPO IkamvaYouth, said news media had a habit of reporting negative stories, a practice which many in the audience believed could affect the youth. He called for the media, instead, to “celebrate South Africa’s achievements so as to inspire people”.He also urged South Africans to continue working towards a better future, regardless of whether their actions were reported in the media. “Sometimes the media is not accessible. So people should just take action and continue with those programmes for the sake of the nation and our youth.” Youth need confidenceMagubane also said young people needed to learn how to articulate their thoughts. “This comes from being taught how to be confident in yourself and who you are.” Confidence and the kinds of thoughts young people had were directly linked to the way they were brought up.While producing the six-part documentary series Why Are We So Angry? which aired on SABC 1 in 2012, Magubane had come across a number of young people who were intelligent but lacked confidence. “We are not seeing young black kids from the township schools being affirmed enough to say they are okay in their existence, that they are good enough and their mind is good enough.”She said the lack of access to quality education was one of the factors driving this low self-esteem. “I think they are at that stage where they want more but they do not have access to it.”last_img read more

Racela apologizes to seniors Dennison, Trinidad for FEU’s Final 4 exit

first_imgHealso apologized to Trinidad, who began the tournament as a starter but fell out of the rotation through the course of the season.“Ron’s growth is actually a reflection of the team’s growth, wherever Ron went the team went with him,” said Racela. “There’s a bright future for him, he’s a good role player and many will be interested in him.”“I also apologized to Jojo for what he went through this season. He started for us, fell from the rotation, and started for us again but you didn’t hear anything from him. It’s all team for him and I appreciate it.”ADVERTISEMENT “I would like to apologize to these two because I couldn’t bring them to the Finals in their last year,” said Racela in Filipino Wednesday at Mall of Asia Arena. “These two are very good players, not just good players, but very good people.”FEU, which finished fourth in Season 80 after a 7-7 record in the elimination round, was able to force Ateneo, the top-seeded team with a 13-1 slate, to use its twice-to-beat advantage in the semifinals with an 80-67 beating in the first game.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutAteneo, though, battled back in the second game to secure a win in overtime and set up a Finals date with defending champion De La Salle.Racela, who just finished his first head coaching year at FEU, said Dennison was the reflection of the Tamaraws’ growth. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 FEU head coach Olsen Racela. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netRon Dennison and Jojo Trinidad bid goodbye to Far Eastern University, and if there’s one person who is saddened to see the two leave is head coach Olsen Racela. Racela and the Tamaraws failed to enter the UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball Finals after losing to Ateneo, 88-84, in their rubber match and this will forever be in the former PBA star’s mind as he regrets not seeing his seniors play for a title.ADVERTISEMENT QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort FEU alum Santos says Tams should learn from Final 4 loss Kris Aquino ‘pretty chill about becoming irrelevant’ For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments Archers, Eagles favorites to win UAAP Season 80 PLAY LIST 02:36Archers, Eagles favorites to win UAAP Season 8002:49La Salle, FEU put ugly offseason brawl behind: ‘Let’s forget what happened’03:43UAAP Season 80 Preview: FEU Tamaraws01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice LATEST STORIES Read Next CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPAlast_img read more

Play By The Rules Promotional Booklet

first_imgPlay by the Rules has created a promotional booklet. Please see below to read what they have to say and to download a copy of the booklet.Play by the Rules provides information, resources, online training and promotional campaigns, but it is so much more than this . . .   . . . it is an ethos or a way of thinking – that everyone involved in sport should be able to do so in an enjoyable, safe environment, free from discrimination, harassment or bullying.We’ve produced a new free promotional booklet which outlines the work we’re doing to make your sport safe, fair and inclusive and how you or your organisation can utilise Play by the Rules effectively. You can download the booklet at www.playbytherules.net.au/resources/promotional-booklet or if you would like a hard copy sent to you please send an email to [email protected] with your address details.Yours in sport,The Play by the Rules team Related LinksPlay By The Ruleslast_img read more

10 months agoGunnarsson: I’ve stayed in touch with Solskjaer; he told me this about Man Utd job…

first_imgGunnarsson: I’ve stayed in touch with Solskjaer; he told me this about Man Utd job…by Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveCardiff City attacker Aron Gunnarsson is backing Ole Gunnar Solskjaer for success at Manchester United.Gunnarsson says Solskjaer’s standing as a United legend will give him a much better chance of success than when in charge of Cardiff when he struggled badly amid major turmoil at the club.Cardiff midfielder Gunnarsson said: “He came in with a positive attitude, looking at the game in a different way. He tried to impact his style of football.“Unfortunately it didn’t work but he’s got a good squad at Man United and all the very best to him. It’s a different job.”The fans know him as a legend. He’s given them good times before and it’s for them to re-live that moment again.“I talked to him afterwards, I kept in touch with him after he left.”He said to me it was a dream job for him to come and manage Man United because he was a player there for years and knows the club inside and out and it’s going to life the fans as well having him on the side-line.”All the very best to him.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

9 months agoINSIDER: Arteta in Isco contact about Man City move

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say INSIDER: Arteta in Isco contact about Man City moveby Carlos Volcano9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City boss Pep Guardiola is in contact with Real Madrid midfielder Isco, it has been revealed.Isco has found himself frozen out at Real by coach Santiago Solari and could be on the move this month.Okdiario’s chief pundit Eduardo Inda, speaking on El Chiringuito, has revealed Guardiola in now in talks with the midfielder – via a very close third party.He said, “Everyone knows that Guardiola loves Isco and 10 days ago, maybe less, a person of absolute confidence of the coach called Isco and asked if at this time he would be willing to take the step to go to the City. “The person who called him was Mikel Arteta.”However, despite his problems with Solari, Real are reluctant to sacrifice Isco midseason. last_img read more