Tag Archives: Adolph

Minister Anxious to Learn More About Federal Infrastructure Programs

first_imgTransportation and Public Works Minister Angus MacIsaac told his federal counterpart, Transport Canada Minister Lawrence Cannon, this week that he is ready to talk about how the province can take advantage of the infrastructure-related funding programs announced in the recent federal budget. Nova Scotia’s entitlement under the programs is expected to total several hundred million dollars over the next seven years. The programs include the Building Canada Program, the Gateways and Border Crossings Fund, the Equal Per Jurisdiction Funding Program and the P3 Projects Fund. Canadian provinces and territories have lobbied the government of Canada for long-term, stable and predictable infrastructure funding for many years. “Up until the recent federal budget, these appeals had fallen on deaf ears,” said Mr. MacIsaac. “These new funding programs will go a long way toward enabling Nova Scotia to achieve its full potential as an international transportation gateway, and facilitating much needed improvements to the province’s highway infrastructure.” Mr. MacIsaac said, “The province is looking forward to learning more about program parameters and to being able to put in place the agreements and protocols necessary to allow cost-shared projects to proceed as quickly as possible.” Mr. MacIsaac thanked Mr. Cannon for intervening on behalf of provinces and territories in the course of the deliberations leading up to the federal budget.last_img read more

Charles Darwins scribbles including how he first wrote term natural selection barred

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The pageCredit:DCMS The page A rare page from Charles Darwin’s On The Origin Of Species  has been barred from leaving the UK by the government as a buyer is sought.The draft page from the book, which served as the foundation of evolutionary biology, contains what is perhaps one of the first times the pioneering scientist scribbled “natural selection”.The manuscript page, worth £490,000,  includes corrections and two inserted passages and so like other known manuscript pages differs substantially from what was eventually published in 1859, the first printing of On The Origin of Species, making it unique.Arts, Heritage and Tourism Minister Michael Ellis has placed a temporary export bar on the page, from a private collection, and two others from Darwin’s later publications, in the hope that a UK buyer will be found.The minister hopes the pages, which are important to national heritage and science, remain in the country.Written at Darwin’s family home, Down House, page number 324 forms part of the English naturalist’s conclusion for Chapter 8, which focuses on hybridism and is the only substantial part of the chapter from the draft to survive.Mr Ellis said the pieces “represent a direct and physical connection” to how Darwin “developed his pioneering work”. Peter Barber, member of the reviewing committee on the export of works of art and objects of cultural interest, which made the decision, said: “Handwritten drafts of Charles Darwin’s books are of the greatest rarity.”The few surviving sheets, touched by and written on by him, with evidence of pauses for contemplation, or spurts reflecting the rapid flow of thought, bring one closer to the man and his process of creation than perhaps anything else.”The fragments under threat of export are particularly important. They show how Darwin revised his texts, pinning successive revisions on to sheets containing an earlier draft.”One fragment comes from his best-known work and indeed includes the words ‘natural selection’. But the other two fragments, from his Expression Of The Emotions In Man And Animals, are perhaps even more important.”Though less well-known than On The Origin Of Species, this book, among the earliest works on behavioural psychology, greatly influenced Sigmund Freud.”The nation has the chance to save revealing and intimate fragments of two works which, directly or indirectly, have shaped and continue to shape the modern world.” He added: “These handwritten and personally signed pieces create an incredibly powerful impression that simply could not be achieved from looking at a digital version or even a published copy.” read more