Tag Archives: Gezi

Bombardier electric technology to be tested on buses in Montreal Germany

MONTREAL — Bombardier’s electric transit technology will be tested next winter on buses in Montreal, followed in early 2014 on an urban route used by passengers in the German city of Mannheim.The transportation giant’s Primove technology is designed to allow buses to be charged by underground induction stations when they stop to let passengers hop on and off.Small amounts of energy emitted from an electromagnetic field are used to quickly charge batteries on the bus and propel it to the next power source. It removes the need for lengthy overnight plug-ins, allowing the buses to remain longer on the road and be outfitted with lighter and smaller batteries.Bombardier will test the technology in Canada’s harsh winter conditions at a special track on Ile-Ste-Helene, the home of Expo 67, in partnership with Hydro-Quebec and an undisclosed bus manufacturer.“We want to test the equipment in the most difficult conditions that you could have with our climate, meaning winter,” spokesman Marc Laforge said in an interview.While Germany will test the system using buses filled with passengers, there are no immediate plans to do so in Canada.Laforge said Bombardier is nearing agreement with a bus manufacturer for projects in North America after Nova Bus, the Quebec-based subsidiary of Volvo Buses, decided not to pursue the required research and development.While Germany’s testing is further advanced, having a bus partner in North America should pave the way for finding a transit operator to push the project towards commercialization.“We’ve got four to five projects under way,” Laforge said. “They are not all at the same level. Germany (most developed) . . . most probably Canada being second and we’ve got other ones.”German bus riders will get the first hands-on opportunity to see the electric buses in action during a 12-month trial beginning in the second quarter of 2014.Regional operator Rhein-Neckar-Verkehr GmbH (RNV) will test the new technology along one of its inner city routes. Germany’s federal Ministry of Transport is providing 3.3 million euros ($4.4-million) to four project partners — RNV, the city of Mannheim, Bombardier Transportation and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology.Two buses outfitted with units under the floor of the vehicles will get charged by underground induction energy transfer stations each time they stop along the route. Laforge said the underground charges are safe for people passing over them. The buses built by the Swiss manufacturer Carrosserie HESS AG will also be equipped with Bombardier’s new Mitrac powertrain for city buses. An electric van equipped with the Primove technology will also be tested as a RNV service vehicle.The Germany team said the project will help to determine a framework for infrastructure, batteries, inductive energy transfer and daily operation by testing the new technology on a real-life route.“We aim to expand public transport’s competitive edge in efficiency by putting the technology of inductively charged electric buses through its paces on a demanding city route and thereby proving its suitability for everyday use,” RNV technical director Martin in der Beek said a news release Monday.Laforge said the technology could be attractive for governments looking to electrifying transit systems without installing overhead wires.Quebec Premier Pauline Marois hailed the electrification of transit as a vision for the 21st century. She recently said such a move would reduce greenhouse gases and allow for the replacement of $30-million of crude oil that is imported daily, mostly for transportation.“Imagine if, instead of using imported oil, our transit systems used a form of energy made right here in Quebec: electricity. It would mean billions of dollars more being invested here every year,” she said in a speech last week.The province has created a $200-million clean transportation fund.The Primove technology, in development for more than five years, needs to be tested before it is sold commercially to transit systems.Laforge said there’s a huge potential market for use of the technology by buses, but said it won’t reduce the demand for light rail or subway systems that are directly supplied by Bombardier.“Every means of transportation serves a different objective,” he said.Bombardier is the world’s largest manufacturer of railway systems. Primove could also be used on its tramway and light rail units, and theoretically for cars. read more

Activision expanding Call of Duty esports competition to yearround league

LOS ANGELES, Calif. – Activision is widening the scope of e-sports competition for “Call of Duty” players.The publisher of the hugely popular military shooter franchise is expanding its e-sports program next year from an annual tournament to year-round international leagues, as well as increasing the prize pool from $1 million to $3 million. The international leagues will be comprised of professional and amateur divisions, culminating in a championship at the end of the year.“This is going to mark a new era of e-sports for ‘Call of Duty,’” said Rob Kostich, senior vice-president and general manager for “Call of Duty” at Activision. “It signals Activision stepping up our commitment to what we’ve been doing with e-sports. We’re expanding our season to make it a fun, competitive year leading into the ‘Call of Duty’ Championship.”The Santa Monica, Calif.-based publisher is calling the revamped e-sports offering the “Call of Duty” World League. The competition will launch in early 2016 with leagues in North America, Europe and Australia and New Zealand. The three territories will each feature independent seasons concluding with 32 teams at the “Call of Duty” Championship in fall 2016.“It felt like the right time to do it,” said Kostich. “We’ve learned a lot over the past few years and talked a lot to our community. We think we have an agenda that’s going to be really attractive to them, and we have a new game coming out, ‘Call of Duty: Black Ops III,’ that we couldn’t be more excited about to lead us into this new era of e-sports.”Activision first hosted a $1 million “Call of Duty” tournament in 2011 during an official “Call of Duty” fan convention and has organized the “Call of Duty” Championship since 2013. Kostich said next year’s expanded e-sports program was devised to offer a deeper level of engagement with pro gamers while also encouraging casual fans and aspiring competitors.“The pro division is really the cream of the crop, the top 150 guys who are actually going to make money from playing this game,” said Sam Cooper, senior director of product management for “Call of Duty” at Activision. “One of the big things we wanted to do with the league was make it much more financially viable to be a pro player in our ecosystem.”Cooper noted that players from regions outside the three pro leagues could compete for a spot in the “Call of Duty” Championship through the amateur division, which will feature both online and in-person competitions. He said that each match in the pro division would be broadcast but declined to specify how, outside of the “Blacks Ops III” live event viewer.Kostich also refused to comment if Activision would drug-test players at its e-sports events. The Electronic Sports League began working with the World Anti-Doping Agency to administer e-sports’ first random drug tests during its ESL One Cologne tournament in August. ESL said all players tested negative but did not specify how many players were tested.ESL began the drug testing after a player said in a YouTube video posted in July that he and his team used the drug Adderall during an ESL tournament in March where players competed for $250,000. Previously, ESL and several other e-sports organizations prohibited the use of drugs, alcohol and other performance enhancers but did not test for doping.Over the past 10 years, e-sports has evolved from a niche genre of gaming to a lucrative sport that draws tens of millions of spectators online and in person. Activision said earlier this year during the “Call of Duty” Championship that more than 175 million copies of “Call of Duty” have been sold across all platforms since the series debuted over a decade ago.___Online:http://www.callofduty.com/esports___Follow AP Entertainment Writer Derrik J. Lang on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/derrikjlang. Activision expanding ‘Call of Duty’ e-sports competition to year-round league FILE – In this June 10, 2014 file photo, models dressed as characters from the video game “Call of Duty” stand at the Activision booth at the Electronic Entertainment Expo, in Los Angeles. Activision is expanding its “Call of Duty” e-sports competition from an annual tournament to a year-round season. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File) by Derrik J. Lang, The Associated Press Posted Sep 24, 2015 12:05 pm MDT Last Updated Sep 24, 2015 at 3:00 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more